The Casual Librarian

My thoughts and opinions


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A Twitter Chat Review: Librarianship Across Borders

collaboration3-870x400Having travelled to an international conference this year, I decided to host June’s @uklibchat with a focus on how librarianship operates cross borders.

In the past 2 years, I have learned a lot from collaborating internationally, and it is something I wish to continue doing for the rest of my career. Going forward as a new professional my interests have begun to include looking at how the impact mentoring and leadership has within librarianship. I am excited by how these two management strategies can influence your professional profile, gaining you opportunities when that profile is added to a global platform.

My team members in @uklibchat are based all over the UK, from them, I have learned strategies and techniques to communicate across different cultures and contexts, to converse with people you have never met (we have since met in person) or only messaged/emailed requires a certain skill set. Communication is key, and once you learn specific ways to converse online I personally think many professional relationships can be established and flourish.

Today I have collated all the excellent topics raised and the positive feedback gained from opening up librarianship and having our profession reach across borders.

Our participants came from far and wide, Ireland, England, USA, Canada, Qatar, South Africa, and Europe. It was a delightful chat and one where this diverse melting pot came together and produced one of my favourite chats since I have joined @uklibchat, so a massive thank you to all who took part.

As I had attended an international conference in June I was interested to see how many others had taken part in an international event, conference or otherwise. It was interesting to see if it was something librarians did annually and if we don’t what are reasons?

The majority did attend a conference, a few took part in International Librarians Network and I was interested in the Erasmus programme one or two people did through their workplace within academic librarianship.

I am a firm believer in the more opportunities that come your way the better you become as a leader. Once you have done something you can be there to give support and encouragement for the next person.

The connections I have made in the last few years have lead to amazing opportunities and I am very interested in other people reasons for connecting internationally.

Here are some mentions:

  • Diverse perspectives
  • Wider vision
  • Access/Sharing support and resources
  • Positive and practical discussions
  • Similar challenges across librarianship, learning the solutions to overcome these challenges
  • Approaching situations in a new light, having a fresh perspective
  • Mentorship & Collaboration
  • Breaking down silos
  • Awareness of library trends
  • Friendship
  • Sharing how we deal with similar threats and challenges

In talking about connecting internationally virtually or face to face I am always conscious of people who find it difficult to make that first step. They can be a new info pro or a new member of an online LIS community. Here we discussed, simple ways to ease yourself into the international community.

1. Be a lurker on a Twitter chat, pick a hashtag a month and jump in if you only have a half hour that’s fine, most chats will create a Storify so you can access the discussion at a later date.

2. Be brave and apply for a bursary to an international conference (or any conference for that matter)

3. Ask your work colleagues what international connections they have, and see can they include you in groups, listserves etc.

4. Sign up for the International Librarians Network

5. Sign up for an international webinar (SLA have many and check out Web Junction)

I would like to focus on the first point, a Twitter chat, if you are thinking of becoming involved in Twitter, by all means, touch base with me. For new members and the established I have added a list of the twitter handles and hashtags mentioned in the chat, so we can all avail of a diverse pool of discussion.

Having spoken about how these international connections can enhance you personally, one question that I was delighted to see is how can this international collaboration benefit your library or library sector? The insight I gained here was wonderful. Here are a few thoughts or tweets!

  • Discover different solutions to universal themes
  • International collaboration helps with interlibrary loan and reference questions
  • International collaboration expands the pool of people and resources/collections, a super, extended library network.
  • New ideas, getting you away from your specific national funding context
  • Intercultural awareness. Understanding of /empathy with others
  • Very interesting to hear about USA perspectives on at @NASIG recently
  • Our library invites int’l librarians to see how we run our service & what we provide & we also learn from their practices
  • Perspective gained from Myanmar at @UKSG …we take our access to info for granted so often..
  • I’d be lost without my international contacts. I value them highly and am always willing to reciprocate with help

LIS sectors can differ, however, the core of librarianship does not change. Taking collaboration alone, can we establish and succeed across LIS sectors?  Many of our participants put forward a positive attitude, saying yes we can. In areas like CPD, I would agree that a group of people from different LIS sectors can produce a successful collaboration. In addition, I think the success of the project would be grounded in the diverse perceptions and experiences the group brought to the table.

Towards the end of the chat, we asked for overseas Twitter handles or blogs that you knew of but not located in your country. Here is the following list.

American:

Europe

Australia

New Zealand

Thank you to everyone who participated, you can find the Storify for the chat on www.uklibchat.wordpress.com/ 

 

 

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Conference Time!

Conferences are an excellent way to keep your CPD profile active. Once you begin to list all the events you have attended it gives you a great sense of accomplishment.

Personally, it allows me to immerse myself into a zone of pure learning.

In the past, I have taken notes and tweeted, but this year I have decided to really listen and to learn, not only from the person presenting but to the conversations that surround me while having a coffee or looking through poster presentations.

It was a different experience and one that left me researching various libraries and librarians. I wanted to know more about their institution and their job role, how they came to be a librarian, and what their values and goals are in their given career.

This reflective post shall focus on aspects I learned from the A&SL 2016 conference held last February. I hope to adapt this learning to my own interests which will enable me to create a piece of work that I can use throughout my career.

Having reflected on video’s posted on YouTube by the A&SL committee I have chosen the first of two areas to focus on. My second post will follow shortly!

Computer security

First, Digital Privacy. The Keynote Speaker for Day 1 is Alison Macrina from The Library Freedom Project. I was really struck by Alison’s journey towards her creation of this amazing project. In 2014 as a technology librarian/IT manager, in a Public Library Alison gave computer privacy classes, this that made me sit up! Computer Privacy Classes, I want to do that someday.

I thought this is something I want to know how to do and do it right. As a librarian, it is crucial to what we do. It is an area I have not concentrated on and I would like to begin my learning. Following Alison on Twitter is the best resource, you get to see the other side of the story that is; our data and more importantly how we the citizens and the world’s governments view privacy in different ways. I need to know where I stand on all this, I need to ask questions.

Do I care that I am being followed all over the internet?

Do I care that they have all my data?

Is my data important to me?

Will learning about privacy make me hate Google and Apple who I really love?

Privacy, I read recently that everyone needs their privacy and everyone does things in private, embarrassing things that you want no one to know about. Then you open up your device click on the World Wide Web and share EVERYTHING with EVERYONE, and the EVERYONE part, are the people who get to keep all that shit! It is scary to actually realise that they know what underwear I like because I have bought it online. No one, well maybe only your partner should know what underwear you like, but other than that it is weird! But we don’t seem to care, or worry about any of this. Teenagers don’t understand that their photo’s can be used in some very seedy ways, as seen recently this year in Cork.

How can we protect ourselves? How can we as librarians help inform our users about digital privacy?

This I need to know. Stay tuned!


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Library Conferences and Connections

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It has been awhile since I have written, as I have been trying to sort out the presentation of my blog for class, one of my classmates has been instrumental so many thanks  to her 

Last weekend was very eventful, I had signed up for the A&SL conference on Friday and on Saturday I was attending the New Professional Day in Pearse Street Library.

I had mixed thoughts on each event, I was looking forward to  hopefully meeting one or two of the librarians from Waterford where I did my internship, and to my luck one lady that I knew was present.

It was brilliant to get her perspective on the day, and we talked a lot about the Masters and how did the Internship match the actual content that we are covering, she was very perplexed when I spoke about Digital Libraries and “metadata” and “XML” which was amazing so I spoke about  my (small piece) of knowledge about this area, she was so encouraging and there was a talk afterwards all about embedding metadata etc, so she was very impressed!

We had a fabulous lunch in the Radisson Hotel, as all of my classmates joined each other to talk about what we had heard from Simon Tanner from Kings College London, about the many tweets that happened and were still ongoing through lunch. This was my VERY first conference and it was daunting at first, however as the day moved on and the topics being covered, I could relate to it, it soon became apparent how  inspiring  it was to be part of that group for a day.

The next day was the New Professionals Day and the same classmates were attending so we all gathered in the foyer for tea and biscuits, 2 of the speakers that were on the previous day were also here, so it was great to be able to have a cup of tea with them and a chat. Michelle Dalton was one of these speakers and it was exciting to find that I was also connected to her through Twitter. Michelle writes a blog for libfocus and it was great to see how enthusiastic she was about our journey through the Masters.

As the day went by the committee made sure that we mingled with others, we were given “personas” I was a librarian for Kings Inn (I had to Google it)  and we had to go to other groups and pretend who we were and “network” this was so empowering as I got to speak with one of the committee member’s from the day before!

The keynote speaker for the day was Jane Burns and she was so encouraging and approachable in the way she outlined her journey through the Library and Information Profession, she showed us various ways to adapt and transfer our skills over the term within the Masters and how to adapt these when we finished. I was truly surprised how she had worked for Failte Ireland  and had never thought that for one second I could use my Hospitality career in a Informational way…EUREKA!

Jane was a true inspiration I felt for the first time in my life I truly knew where I was headed in a career, and that the people I was surrounded by where true to their nature and loved every piece of their profession, the helpful hints they all gave will not be forgotten from twitter connections too blogs being commented on, truly means this profession is where I want to be.

A HUGE thank you to all!